John Watson is an honourable man. Not only this, but he is not a coward. I think we can be certain that he not lying when he says he’s not gay, despite the oft-challenged nature of his sexuality.

The thing is, his responses to questions or allusions about his and Sherlock’s relationship aren’t even relevant answers. Nobody has called him gay outright. What they have spoken of instead is that particular relationship he has with Sherlock. When John answers instead with a statement about his personal identity, he isn’t refuting anything that anyone has said, because it isn’t even the same topic, and he knows it.

What John doesn’t say is this: I am not in love with Sherlock Holmes.

He doesn’t say this, because it isn’t true.

Watching ST: Voyager's reputed worst episode with the family…
Me: [laughing hysterically] he’s a Time Lord! Tom Paris is a Time Lord!
Family: what
Me: He just regenerated and he’s got two hearts!
Family: are you okay

Watching ST: Voyager's reputed worst episode with the family…

Me: [laughing hysterically] he’s a Time Lord! Tom Paris is a Time Lord!

Family: what

Me: He just regenerated and he’s got two hearts!

Family: are you okay

Take Me To Church By Hozier (Sherlock FanVid by A August)

(Source: youtube.com, via consulting-chemist)

Several months after Season 3 has aired…

"Wait, hang on. When Sherlock faked his death, he replaced the cadaver on the ground… How did he not breathe the whole time while John was looking at him and checking for a pulse and all that? In fact, how did he not blink?

MOFFTISS LIED TO US AGAIN [sob] [sob]

Somebody point me in the direction of The Empty Hearse. I need to talk to Anderson.

Elim Garak: probably the shadiest, most fascinating, most versatile, (and sometimes most sassy) person of interest on Deep Space Nine

(Source: youngwolf211, via crushingoncrusher)

The Educational Argument for Sherlock: Biology

Biology is not the most obvious of the sciences in Sherlock (that would probably be chemistry), but it certainly has its moments in the spotlight. So, some biological moments of prominence.

First of all, there’s lots of death, which is clearly very biological. Lots of cadavers. In nearly every episode.

Clostridium botulinum is a bacteria that features heavily in The Great Game. We learn from these scenes that botulinum poisoning can result from overdoses of botox, which is very important in life.

We get lots of near-deaths also: when Sherlock gets shot in His Last Vow, much of the mind palace scene involves the biological reaction to a bullet through the chest: shock, extreme pain, etc. And blood.

Another near-death is the stabbing of Major Sholto: his belt holds his skin tightly in place so that he (and Private Bainbridge) have delayed bleeding due to the pressure applied to the wound at first.

We learned also, in Hounds, that a jellyfish gene spliced into the rabbit genome can make a rabbit glow.

And of course, the Baskerville base itself is highly connected with biological experimentation and weaponry.

Presenting: The Educational Argument for Sherlock - Justification for showing Sherlock in biology, world languages, chemistry, history, politics, law, home economics, and much more…
Because we all know how educational Sherlock is, but sometimes our schoolteachers, professors, and/or colleagues can’t understand this.

Presenting: The Educational Argument for Sherlock - Justification for showing Sherlock in biology, world languages, chemistry, history, politics, law, home economics, and much more…

Because we all know how educational Sherlock is, but sometimes our schoolteachers, professors, and/or colleagues can’t understand this.